Thu 20 June
    9.00 - 10.30
    10.45 - 12.15
    13.30 - 15.00
    15.15 - 16.45
    17.00 - 18.15

Fri 21 June
    09.00 - 10.30
    10.45 - 12.15
    13.30 - 15.00
    15.15 - 16.45
    17.00 - 18.15

Sat 22 June
    09.00 - 10.30
    10.45 - 12.15
    13.00 - 14.30

All days
Go back

Thursday 20 June 2019 9.00 - 10.30
B-1 GLM11 Gendered and Racialized Bodies on the Move: South Korea's Experience with Transnational Labor Migration
Scheltema
Chair: Seung-kyung Kim Organizer: Seung-kyung Kim
Discussant: Jae Kyung Lee
Changhye Ahn, Na-Young Lee : The State Role in Creating Migrant Women’s Vulnerability: Interplay between Labor Migration and Prostitution Policies in South Korea
This presentation aims to examine the interplay among different state policies resulting in vulnerability of migrant women, by focusing on the labor migration policy and prostitution policy in South Korea. On one hand, the labor migration policy stratifies the potential labor pool based on ethnicity and gender, and fails to ... (Show more)
This presentation aims to examine the interplay among different state policies resulting in vulnerability of migrant women, by focusing on the labor migration policy and prostitution policy in South Korea. On one hand, the labor migration policy stratifies the potential labor pool based on ethnicity and gender, and fails to recognize that women outside the Korean ethnic boundary are also subjects of labor migration. The prostitution policy, on the other hand, harbors both inconsistent views on prostitution as well as contradictory implementation practices, in which moralistic judgement, tacit government condonation, and efforts to protect women’s human rights coexist. We argue that these two policies, without appropriately considering migrant women’s chances of formal employment and human rights, interplay and contribute to their legal instability, which may lead to their entering the sex trade and making them vulnerable to further violence and exploitation. South Korea, we suggest, provides a good case that can be added to current discussions on a state’s role in constituting conditions in which prostitution rises as an alternative and resisting against the exploitation becomes much riskier for women from the Global South.
(Show less)

Yonson Ahn : The Managed Hearts of ‘Yellow Angels’: Korean Nurse Guest Workers in Germany
Transnational migration has been a central feature in the provision of health care in the post World War II West, and, an example of this is the more than 11,000 nurses and nurse assistants who were sent from South Korea to the former West Germany between the 1950s and the ... (Show more)
Transnational migration has been a central feature in the provision of health care in the post World War II West, and, an example of this is the more than 11,000 nurses and nurse assistants who were sent from South Korea to the former West Germany between the 1950s and the 1970s.

This study, based on the nurses’ experiences at work, investigates the nature of nursing care work as emotional labor and especially the relations between nurses and their patients. It also examines the ways in which the stereotypical image of Asian femininity was shaped in support of care work. Tronto (1994) defines good care as a highly complex activity, requiring a vast range of tasks and skills such as attentiveness, evaluation of different alternatives to meet needs, and responsiveness. Thus, delivery of nursing care involves monitoring both physical and emotional wellbeing, and “care labour is embodied labour” as Anderson and Shutes (2014: 217) address. Nursing is simultaneously a professionalized labor of skill and a labor of love imagined as a familial-type relationship. The image of the nurse as a caring mother figure overlaps with the stereotypical feminine image of Asian women as kind, gentle, polite, smiling, and docile, that was circulating in the Germany of the time (Ahn 2014).

This study is based on personal accounts of fifteen former Korean nurses or nurse assistants who were interviewed in Germany between 2011 and 2016. (Show less)

Seonok Lee : Making of a New “Underclass”: Racialized Foreign Migrant Workers in South Korea
This study examines the creation of a new “underclass” - racialized foreign migrant workers in South Korea. Since the 1990s, South Korea has actively recruited low skilled foreign migrant workers from Southeast Asia and China. These migrants have gradually replaced the traditional working class, assuming the position of an “underclass.” ... (Show more)
This study examines the creation of a new “underclass” - racialized foreign migrant workers in South Korea. Since the 1990s, South Korea has actively recruited low skilled foreign migrant workers from Southeast Asia and China. These migrants have gradually replaced the traditional working class, assuming the position of an “underclass.” How do racial logics intersect with economic logics in the labor market to produce this class of racialized foreign migrant workers? Drawing upon ethnographic research and four months experience working alongside migrants in factories, I argue that diverse strategies of boundary making are utilized in the creation of this new “underclass”. Korean workers draw hierarchical boundaries by stressing the ideals of a ‘good worker’ and making their own moral judgements on the work ethic of foreign workers. I also argue that South Korea’s split labor market is created along two inter-related dimensions: 1) employment status under the expansion of precarious employment categories and Korean guest worker programs for migrants, and 2) ethno-racial status, which is largely determined by shared language, ethnicity, and skin color. This study contributes to updating Bonacich’s(1976) influential split labor market theory, which has been widely criticized for assuming a static two-tiered labor market. This study shows that split labor markets are actively created and reproduced through boundary making practices by multiple actors (the Korean state, supervisors, and co-workers) at multiple scales from national labor immigration policy, to business community demands, to everyday interactions. (Show less)



Theme by Danetsoft and Danang Probo Sayekti inspired by Maksimer