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Thursday 20 June 2019 10.45 - 12.15
C-2 GLM13 Global Migration Governance and Migrant Workers' Rights: Antecedents, Constraints, and Implications
Posthumus
Chair: Nicola Piper Organizer: Charlie Fanning
Discussant: Neha Misra
Charlie Fanning : From the ILO to Intergovernentalism: the Ideological Roots of the Modern Global Migration Regime
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Jill Jensen : ‘Labor Surplus’ Economies in the Developing World: The World Employment Program and Migration for Employment
Migration for employment holds the propensity for abusive situations to arise. When opportunities are stifled in a country of origin, one option is to take the risk of international movement; but the laws of host nations disadvantage non-citizens. Cognizant of these vulnerabilities, the Constitution of the International Labor Organization (ILO) ... (Show more)
Migration for employment holds the propensity for abusive situations to arise. When opportunities are stifled in a country of origin, one option is to take the risk of international movement; but the laws of host nations disadvantage non-citizens. Cognizant of these vulnerabilities, the Constitution of the International Labor Organization (ILO) pledged attention for the “protection of the interests of workers when employed in countries other than their own.” As the UN agency tasked with formulating global labor standards, the ILO has periodically introduced governing “instruments” to do so. In the 1970s, a realm of initiatives began, offering new approaches to migration undertaken out of economic necessity in an increasingly competitive and globalized world market. Under the auspices of the World Employment Programs (WEP), those involved sought to address the problems of poverty with an “employment-oriented development strategy.”
My paper will outline suggestions coming from the WEP on employment creation in the developing world, coupled with transnational cooperation surrounding human migration. Given the so called “labor surplus,” as Third World populations were rising, policy recommendations encompassed a set of goals for increasing “productive employment,” meanwhile supporting fairer terms of trade so to make remunerative work more of a possibility in countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America. In terms of migration specifically, the goal was to promote a reciprocally advantageous international division of labor covered by international standards, including the protection of social, collective, and trade union rights, as well as equality of opportunity and cultural freedoms. (Show less)

Nelson Lichtenstein : NAFTA Politics and Mexican Migration to the U.S. in the 1990s
This paper examines the politics and political economy of the North American Free Trade Agreement and how it impacted industrial location and migration patterns in the 1990s.



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