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Thursday 20 June 2019 15.15 - 16.45
C-4 GLM03 At the Nexus of Asylum and Labor Market Policies
Posthumus
Chair: Leo Lucassen Organizer: Ruth Wasem
Discussant: Heidi Gottfried
Yael Schacher : Not Natural or Automatic: Work Authorization for Asylum seekers in the United States in the 1970s and 1980s
In litigation over DACA, both sides have pointed to an automatic “rubber stamping” of work authorizations for certain unlawfully present immigrants; defenders of DACA (and formerly also DAPA) argue that immigration officials have had the authority to do this since at least 1980s. Indeed, the 2015 government brief defending DACA ... (Show more)
In litigation over DACA, both sides have pointed to an automatic “rubber stamping” of work authorizations for certain unlawfully present immigrants; defenders of DACA (and formerly also DAPA) argue that immigration officials have had the authority to do this since at least 1980s. Indeed, the 2015 government brief defending DACA and DAPA programs argued that "The connection between enforcement discretion and work authorization is close and natural” and that “by the early 1970s, the INS’s ordinary practice was to authorize illegal aliens to work when it decided not to pursue deportation.” What is lost in the argument over the authority to grant work authorization is a history of contestation: for two decades, lawyers for asylum seekers in the United States had to go to court to ensure that their clients received authorization to work from the officials who had the authority to grant it. This paper will analyze this contestation, specifically focusing on litigation between 1974-1978 over work authorization for Haitian asylum-applicants and between 1986-1989 over work authorization for Central American asylum-applicants. The litigation raised a fundamental issue that still bedevils American policy because of an insistence on a sharp and unrealistic distinction between those who flee as refugees and those who migrate to work. (Show less)

Marlou Schrover : Refugee migration and labour market participation from a historical perspective: the Netherlands 1900-now
A common assumption is that refugees who arrived during an economic crisis will find it difficult to find work, while those we arrive during an economic boom will find work more easily.
This paper looks at several groups of refugees who came to the Netherlands over the past hundred years. Chances ... (Show more)
A common assumption is that refugees who arrived during an economic crisis will find it difficult to find work, while those we arrive during an economic boom will find work more easily.
This paper looks at several groups of refugees who came to the Netherlands over the past hundred years. Chances on the labour market were influencers not only by the economic situation but also by the country of origin of the migrants, their class position, gender, religion and regional background of ethnicity. Some groups of migrants (the Vietnamese for instance) were believed to middle class and therefore found different networks, and ended up in different neighbourhoods. Other groups of migrants found were generically seen as lower class, and this affected network formation and geographical concentrations, as well as the support that was offered. (Show less)

Ruth Wasem : The Struggle for Fairness
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